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Golf Instruction

Golf instruction refers to teaching the game of golf. Golf instructors require both technical and physical ability to teach golf, and are typically best performed by recognized golf instructors certified by relevant bodies such as the professional golf association in the United States. Golf instructors typically use a combination of physical conditioning, driving range instruction, videotaped swing analysis, and on-course play to teach. Golfers begin to learn by learning the fundamentals of the swing and the different aspects of the various shots required to play golf. GolfSmash's instruction page is one of the first golf websites to provide golfers with real-time lessons from real golf instructors around the world. GolfSmash's certified golf instructors will post their daily tips, comment on questions, analyze golf swings, and communicate directly with golfers who have questions. Golfers can also follow their favorite golf instructors and will be automatically notified when the instructors they are following post new tips. GolfSmash's golf instructors will be ranked throughout the world based on the interaction golfers have with them, number of followers, and the number of posts on GolfSmash.
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OfficialGolfSmash
(Students 13)
May 22, 2014 9:34 PM Full Swing | Beginner
 
Don’t try to hit the ball as hard as you can If you arms tighten, the club will buckle and you will use an all arm swing, causing the ball the be erratic and uncontrolable. Don’t get stuck on your back foot Allow the club to get to impact with the ball and put your energy going forward. If you fall back wards, the club head will thrust through-again, having your arms and hands slap through for uncontrollable golf shot. Return the golf club to where you begin the swing Swing easy and allow your body and arms to do all of the work. Take some practice swings about 50% of your actual swing. This will give you time to feel your swing. Fell the weight load and unload When you take the club back, allow the weigh to load on your backswing side. On the follow through, let the energy unload to the forward leg. Don’t hang back. Swing easy Allow the club to stretch out so you don’t feel stuck. This will allow the club to swing on the correct plane and create freedom and momentum in your swing.
3 Comments
OfficialGolfSmash
(Students 13)
Apr 3, 2014 2:20 PM Full Swing | All Levels
I can’t count the amount of times I’ve taught someone, especially beginners and they bend their left arm in the backswing. This is the most common mistake I see people make in their golf swing and should be the #1 thing focused on because it is the beginning and end of your golf swing. When a player keeps their left arm straight, they are allowing the club to swing on it’s natural plane. This will help the right hand golfer and of course, if you are a lefty- the opposite goes for you!
2 Comments
Brad Smith, PGA
(Students 3)
Oct 30, 2014 8:03 PM Miscellaneous | All Levels
 
Somewhere along the line, golf became all about numbers. Golfers are constantly talking about their scores, their handicaps, and the ratings and slopes of courses. However, fundamentally, golf has never had anything to do with numbers. For the first part of golf’s history there were no such things as pars, birdies, and bogeys. Therefore, you could not be above or below par. There was no magical 72 to judge yourself against. The game was all about getting the ball in the hole in the fewest strokes possible. Unfortunately, the magical 72 has become a part of golf psychology today. But there’s a way to remedy this unfortunate event. Golfers should never ever worry about the par of the hole. If you find yourself on an unusually long par 4 (one that you’re unsure you can hit in regulation), play it like a par 5. Let the bogey feel like a par. Do the same things on short par 5s. Play them like par 4s and you’ll get birdie. If there’s a par 3 that requires only a pitch, play it like a par 2 since it’s only a pitch and putt. After you’ve mastered this technique, start working on forgetting about your score during the round. A lot of times, when golfers have great rounds they start thinking, “If I par out I’ll shoot my best round ever.” This thought is very unhealthy because it doesn’t set new goals. The player should be thinking about knocking the ball in the hole as soon as possible, not about just saving par.
2 Comments
MattRistine
(Students 1)
Nov 2, 2014 12:59 AM Miscellaneous | All Levels
 
One of the best feelings in golf is setting a new personal best score. It doesn’t really matter if you do it in a tournament, a round with your friends, or just a round when you went out by yourself after work. Whatever the circumstances may be, posting your all-time low round is a feeling that you will remember for a long time. For me, that number is 65. I have shot 65 just once in my life, and I remember it clearly. While I played in many great tournaments through the years, my 65 came during a casual round with nothing on the line – yet I remember it like it was yesterday. Perhaps I’ll find a way to post a 64 one day, but 65 is my magic number until that day. What is your career best round? Are you stuck on 80 and wish you could make your way into the 70’s? Maybe you have never quite gotten below 100, and feel the pressure every time you have a chance. No matter what the number is for you, the mental challenges that golfers face when trying to lower their career best are always the same. Following are three quick tips to help you break down the barrier and successfully post your new best round – #1 – Don’t Do the Math The worst thing you can do is get out the scorecard early in the round and start doing the math on what you need to do to break your record. You don’t want to be thinking about that number on every shot that you hit – rather, your attention needs to be focused on the shot at hand as you make your way around the course. All you can do is your best on each shot. #2 – Don’t Limit Yourself Imagine that your best ever round is an 80, and you are hoping to one day break into the 70’s. That doesn’t mean you have to shoot a 79…you could go ahead and shoot a 75, or better, and breakthrough in style. Don’t put mental limits on yourself or your scoring ability based on the past. Do your best for all 18 holes and you might be surprised at what is possible. #3 – Don’t Panic It is easy to get nervous and panic a little bit when you start to get close to the end of the round and you still have a chance at your new record. The best way to successfully set your new record is to do exactly what you have been doing all round long. It doesn’t take anything superhuman to set a new scoring record – it just takes consistency. Keep a calm head and make good decisions all the way through to the last shot. If you are able to maintain focus and patience, that new record could be well within reach.
1 Comments
OfficialGolfSmash
(Students 13)
Apr 24, 2014 12:40 PM Full Swing | Beginner
 
The Pre- Shot Routine is a very important part of your golf game. It is the strike of the match; so to speak, in regards to the way you begin your approach to your golf shot. The pre- shot routine is a great way to calm the nerves and take away some of the thinking that goes into your shot. The reasoning behind this is that you are able to go into autopilot because you do the exact same thing every time you step up to the ball, no matter what the shot. In reaction sports, a pre shot routine is unnecessary but in golf, it is crucial. I don’t know anyone who wouldn’t want to eliminate the nerves, anxiety, and doubt that so often creeps in when stepping up to hit a golf shot. A pre- shot routine allow the body to take control and the mind to take a rest. In golf, the more you can ease the mind, the better you will play! Keep in mind, you can create any routine that makes you the most comfortable, just make sure it is repeated every time. An example of a pre- shot routine from start to finish would go something like this: This is an example if you are standing on the tee box with your driver, and the same goes for any other shot. Tee up your ball. Once you have chosen a good spot for your tee shot, step back behind the ball and look toward to hole/fairway. Choose the line or area you would like to hit your golf shot. Next, take a practice swing or two, visualizing and feeling the same thing you’d like to do with your actual swing. Walk into your shot and set the club down by the ball, take your stance and tilt your head in the direction of the area you’ve chosen. Last step, is pulling the trigger- hit your shot toward the chosen area and your good to go! Doing this pre shot routine or one similar will help you lower your scores and allow you to focus on other parts of your game. It allows the body to go on autopilot and makes the game simpler and fun!
1 Comments
MattRistine
(Students 1)
Dec 29, 2014 4:53 AM Quick Tips | All Levels
 
For most golfers, winter is a slower time of year. Even if you live in a warm state, chances are you won't play as much golf during the winter as you will in the summer. While that might not be much fun, it does give you the chance to work on your game and improve some of your weaknesses. You don't want to mess with your swing in the summer when you are busy playing as much as possible, so put off those changes until the off-season. So what should you work on during the winter? Figuring that out is as easy as looking back on the season that you just finished. What were the weak parts of your game? Where were you happy with your performance? You shouldn't have to think too long in order to decide what parts of the game you need to work on. Don't make the same mistake that most golfers make and practice the parts of the game that you are already good at - attack your weaknesses if you really want to get better. Below are a few ideas for improvements you can make during the winter months - Ball flight change. If you would like to change from a draw to a fade, or vise versa, winter is the perfect time to make the change. This is an adjustment that will take some time, so it is best done when you aren't playing very often. Grip changes. Making an adjustment to your grip might be the most challenging change that you can make in your game. Should you decide to change your grip, commit to taking some time away from the course so you can simply practice your new grip on the driving range until it becomes comfortable. Changing putters. Decided that you need a new putter to take your performance on the greens to the next level? Try putting the new flat stick in the bag during the winter. That way you can gradually get used to the new putter before the golf season really kicks in again. For any major change you plan to make in your game, the winter season is the ideal time to do the job. Give yourself plenty of time in between rounds to work on your improvements, and you should be ready to take a big step forward in your game when spring arrives.
1 Comments
OfficialGolfSmash
(Students 13)
Jul 2, 2014 4:37 PM Full Swing | All Levels
 
When you shank a golf ball, the clubface is typically square or slightly closed and you catch/strike it in the hosel aka the neck of the club. You can occasionally hit it on the back of the heel and the ball will go backwards or very close to your friends on the driving range! The swing path is very important, as I have discussed prior. When you take your backswing and then come down to complete your follow through, it’s easier to hit a shank if you are coming over the top. To come over the top, the backswing and follow through are not on the same path, and your club comes through on too steep of an angle. The other way the shank can occur is if your hands are too far from your body at impact/set up. Your arms will need to reach to the ball and you end up coming down on the ball, instead of swinging more around your body. The easiest way to end the disastrous shanks, try taking the club, straight back and straight through. Most likely, a small tweak with your swing path will be the answer to your shanking woes.
1 Comments
OfficialGolfSmash
(Students 13)
May 22, 2014 9:49 PM Full Swing | Beginner
 
To increase distance and accuracy of your drives, follow these simple steps: 1. Have repetitive and solid set up. 2. Aim your shoulders, feet, and hips toward your target- all in line with eachother. 3. Tilt your shoulders to the right and relax your muscles. 4. Rotate your body back completely. 5. Keep your arms far away from your body and keep your shoulders parallel to your target. 6. DON'T START YOUR BACKSWING TOO SOON from your backswing. 7. Be patient in your transition to your forward swing 8. Hold your finish and remain balanced. *If you develop a good shot routine and triggers to keep you focused on the basics, there is no doubt that you will start hitting better drives. Good luck and Drive on!
1 Comments
OfficialGolfSmash
(Students 13)
Sep 5, 2014 11:35 PM Full Swing | Beginner
Love or Hate Golf? When playing a round of golf, you can either choose to love the game that makes you so mad or hate it all together. We all know that golf is one of the most demanding games in existenstence, so I’m going to share some ways to improve your enjoyment and learn new skills along the way! FIrst off, I would say to choose a positive state of mind. Understanding that you are only as good as your missed shots, is crucial in warding off unwanted thoughts and tendencies. Next, think of your golf swing and body as being a connected machine that if one part comes loose, the rest has to compensate. This is the normal order of things in this game, but being able to limit your over-compensations, can lead to less errors in your golf shots. Another way to make the round more enjoyable, is too look at it as a FUN activity, not a life or death situation. Even the tour players that are in contention to win, know that a mistake is bound to happen. Making the most of every situation in golf will lend to a more enjoyable experience all together.
1 Comments
Brad Smith, PGA
(Students 3)
Oct 29, 2014 8:02 PM Miscellaneous | All Levels
It's time for quality instruction anytime and anywhere in the world.
1 Comments
Brad Smith, PGA
(Students 3)
Nov 15, 2014 2:04 AM Full Swing | All Levels
 
Most amateurs swing with all the power they have but with no balance. Next time you watch professionals on television you will see that golf is all about finesse, timing and balance. Watch how every professional finishes their swing with great balance. They are in control of their swings and have the discipline of not exerting anymore effort than is needed for a great shot. To learn how they do this, first watch and study how they finish in balance each time. Try this in your own yard without a ball. Imagine how it looks and feels. On a few swings, close your eyes so you will heighten the sensation and balance. Once you can finish in balance each time than take it to the course. Always think how you will finish each swing before making your actual swing through the ball.
0 Comments
Brad Smith, PGA
(Students 3)
Oct 31, 2014 12:00 AM Quick Tips | Beginner
I've found that you need to be a kid at heart to teach juniors. I find anything to make them remember what we're learning at the time. I've had them hit water ballons, long drive with marshmallows, time contest on how quick they can tee five balls up, straightest drive, tossing balls in a circle on the green, and hitting rubber ducks out of the sand. Make it fun at younger ages until they're ready to make real changes.
0 Comments

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