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19th Hole
News and Opinion

Golf Blogs: Golf

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Date CreatedMost Popular

Sean Donnelly
Olympic Golf: Amateurism Is The Solution
Jul 7, 2016 6:04 AM
Tags: Olympics   Golf   Rio de Janeiro   IOC   IGF  
 
Professionalism has never been a comfortable fit with the Olympic Games. For all of the International Olympic Committee’s (IOC) well-documented institutional failings, the body remains legally registered as a not for profit organization and the modern Games were crafted in the noble, Victorian image of sport which remained prevalent in Europe in the late nineteenth-century. Monty on golf at the Olympics and the high profile withdrawals: "We wait since 1904 - and then we don't turn up" https://t.co/D7uqIkyq15 — Tom English (@BBCTomEnglish) 6 July 2016 To men such as Pierre de Coubertin, Demetrios Vikelas and Evangelis Zappas, sport was entirely divorced from the world of commerce; its principal function was to provide young men (and it was almost always men) with a kind of moral education (fair play, hard work, etc.) at the same time as promoting physical well-being. Much in the world has changed, however, since the Olympics’ was revived in Athens in 1896. Professional sport now stands as one of the foremost consumer attractions in the Western world; a multi-trillion dollar industry underpinned by enormous stadia, massive live broadcast revenues and an apparently ceaseless stream of advertising and sponsorship profits. At grass-roots level, in schools and in regional clubs, sport is still looked upon as a healthy recreational activity, but any adolescent who stands out in a discipline is now likely to look upon their sporting development as a route into a potentially lucrative professional career. Not all disciplines have flourished to the remarkable extent of soccer, basketball, tennis or golf in the Open era, of course, and in this context it is notable that the sports that do best at the Olympics – the track & field disciplines, swimming and gymnastics – lack the international popularity required to thrive as standalone commercial entities. It is for this reason that bodies such as the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) and the International Swimming Federation (FINA) continue to rely on the IOC to provide their sport with a global platform to attract investment every four years. No track athlete in a non-mainstream Olympic discipline will ever compete on a grander or more historic stage than that which is provided at the Summer Games; it is for this reason that an Olympic gold constitutes the pinnacle of so many athletes’ careers. The same cannot be said of Neymar, Roger Federer or LeBron James, for instance, to whom a UEFA Champions League medal, a Wimbledon title or an NBA medal would obviously mean far more. All major international, professional sports have a hierarchy of accomplishment built into their unique competitive superstructures, most of which developed entirely divorced from the Olympics in the early twentieth-century. It is for this reason that a Masters, US Open, Open Championship or US PGA Championship will always mean more to the world’s best golfers than an Olympic gold, just as an Olympic triumph will never surpass the importance of a Grand Slam win in tennis or an NBA triumph in basketball. The mass withdrawal of the majority of the PGA Tour’s leading players from the Rio Games sets this reality in sharp relief and if the International Golf Federation (IGF) want to make their involvement with the IOC last beyond the Tokyo Games in 2020, they need to play to the Olympics’ strengths by making Olympic golf an event for amateur players. To male golfers, the Olympics are an unnecessary distraction during peak golf season https://t.co/lxBU9oW8Ew pic.twitter.com/lGAxNYsqqE— The Economist (@TheEconomist) 4 July 2016 This arrangement has worked exceptionally well for boxing for two reasons. First, the competitors are sufficiently young and unproven so that the Olympics means a great deal to them; it is the biggest stage on which it is possible to fight before turning professional and success often leads to a pro-career. Second, Olympic boxing affords fans of the professional sport a unique opportunity to see the best young fighters of the future. There is no reason why such a strategy cannot work in golf and, as the spate of withdrawals which have shredded the integrity of the Rio Games demonstrates, a new formula is desperately needed. [Image Source: Flickr under CC]
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Sean Donnelly
Three Great Golf Drinks for 2016
Jan 2, 2016 9:08 AM
Tags: Golf   Bobby Jones   Arnold Palmer   John Daly   Drinks   Cocktails  
 
Golf is more than just game; indeed, for the kind of people that pass their time reading these sorts of blogs, the sport constitutes something akin to a separatist faith. The ritual, tradition and sense of community that is associated with meeting at the golf club each weekend is replete with curious religious parallels and it seems safe to say that, unless you are a high-level competitive performer, it is social aspect of golf, rather than lowering your handicap, which stands as the most seductive aspect of the sport. It is for this reason that the culture of the 19th-hole, that hallowed post-round drink and chat, is so universally popular. But while nothing can quite rival the taste of a refreshing, cold beer at the end of a hot summer’s afternoon on the course, the social life around golf can be greatly enhanced for the addition of a few sport-related cocktails to one’s drinks repertoire. Here follows my list of three great golf cocktails that every 19th hole lover should consider sampling in 2016 – think of it as a very pleasurable New Year’s resolution! 1. The Arnold Palmer 2 oz iced tea 2 oz lemonade The man hardly requires any introduction at all: Palmer claimed seven majors between 1958 and ’70; winning four Green Jackets, one US Open (1960) and two Open Championships while posting three runners-up finishes at the US PGA. The man is a bona fide legend of the sport and his success, allied to that of Jack Nicklaus and Lee Trevino, went a long way towards transforming golf into the fully modernized, internationally popular professional discipline that it is today. For a man nicknamed The King, though, Arnie’s favourite cocktail is surprisingly straightforward: two parts iced tea and two parts lemonade – no alcohol at all. Such a mocktail is essential for any 19th hole gathering in a private venue for the non-drinkers among us but the refreshing base that the iced tea and lemonade affords can be easily built upon in order to offer a boozy version of Arnie’s classic. A Bobby Jones, for instance, calls for Firefly Sweet Tea Vodka and southern sweetened iced tea while a Happy Gilmore adds a shot or two of grain alcohol (for the strong stomached among us). My personal favourite, though, and I admit this is in part born of a long-time admiration for the drink’s supposed inventor, is the John Daly which simply introduces a shot of vodka into the original version – served on ice, it’s the perfect tonic at the end of a long round. 2. The Crooked Golf Cart 1 part Amaretto 5 parts cranberry juice 2 slices of lime Splash of rum As the name suggests, this is one for having after the round. The almond sweetness of the Amaretto offers a perfect counterpoint to the bitter acidity of the lime and cranberry while the rum offers a robust body to the drink as a whole. The Amaretto can be pricy but it is a high-alcohol, very strongly flavored spirit and will last you through a lot of 19th hole sessions provided you stick to the recipe. It is also used in a lot of Italian desert dishes such as Tiramisu if you really want to treat your playing party to a good time. 3. Hole-In-One Shooter It’s one of the game’s oldest and most strictly adhered to traditions that if any player scores an ace during a round, he buys the entire playing party drinks at clubhouse. As someone who has yet to pull-off a hole-in-one, that is one round of drinks I would be happy to buy but few bars can ever beat the personal touch of a homemade cocktail composed of good ingredients. If I do ever shoot that ace, this is what I’ll be drinking: ¾ oz melon liqueur ¼ oz apple brandy 2 dashes cream The sharp acidity of the apple contrasts ideally with rounder fruit flavor of the melon liqueur while the topping of cream adds a welcome lactic softness to the drink…as you can probably tell, I have had this before, hole-in-one or not! [Image Source: Flickr under CC]
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CLTheGolfer
A List of Pro Athletes Who Play Golf Pretty Well
Nov 13, 2015 6:20 PM
Tags: pro athletes   play golf   nba   Golf   mlb   professional atheltes   tony romo  
 
If you are a fan of golf, you have probably noticed that there are a lot of professional athletes in other sports that actually play golf. That’s right, there are pro football players, like Tony Romo, who have been known to pick up a set of clubs and pro baseball players, like Alex Rodriquez, who have hit the links from time to time. Sure, this isn’t all that surprising, pro athletes playing golf. However, what is surprising is that a lot of these athletes are pretty good at it. To learn who they are, and gain some fun knowledge about golf, keep your attention tuned here. One current professional athlete who is good at golf is NBA player Steph Curry. When he’s not draining three’s on the hardwood and winning championships, Curry can be found at the golf course in the off-season. He has stated that his handicap is only at a 2 thanks to three years of playing competitive high school golf. One former pro athlete who can handle a golf course pretty well is Brett Favre who played for the Green Bay Packers, the New York Jets, and the Minnesota Vikings. Favre was known on the football field as being a gun slinger who the ball who did everything he possibly could to win. On the links, he’s not that bad either and only has a 1 handicap, which is pretty impressive and since he’s been in retirement, it has probably only gotten better. A third professional athlete who does well at golf is Kyle Loshe. A pitcher for the Milwaukee Brewers, Loshe has had to work at his golf game over the years and through that hard work, he has managed to drop his handicap to an impressive 2.9 strokes. Basically, Loshe has made it a priority to practice his game and it has definitely paid off. And, in addition to the athletes already mentioned, a few more who know their way around a golf course include: NFL quarterback Drew Brees who has a handicap of 3 NFL quarterback Derek Anderson who shoots around 2 over par Professional skier Nate Roberts who is a scratch golfer Former NBA player Michael Jordan who has a 3 or 4 handicap Romo who was already mentioned who has around a 3 handicap MLB infielder Nick Punto who has a 2.3 handicap NHL defenseman John-Michael Liles who has a around a 1 handicap So, now you know about what professional athletes, past and present, who have played and are good at golf. To find out about more, just jump online. It is actually pretty amazing how many there are, giving you something interesting to talk about the next time you find yourself in a sports related conversation.
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CLTheGolfer
Ways To Stay In Shape In The Off-Season
Nov 8, 2015 1:58 PM
Tags: golf season   Golf   weight lifting   off-season   workout  
 
You’ve decided that this off-season, you want to stay in golf shape. The problem is, you’re just not quite sure how to do it. Well, don’t worry because staying in shape to golf really isn’t that difficult to do when you can’t hit the course and to learn how you can stay on top of your game, just keep on reading. First thing you need to do to stay in golf shape is to bring your clubs indoors when the weather turns cold. Reason being, you are going to want to keep on top of your golf swing and to do that, it is essential that you continually swing your clubs even if you cannot play nine holes. So, when you have a free moment, grab a club and head to an open spot in your house to swing a few of your clubs. You don’t have to do this every day, but make it a point to swing your clubs a few times a week to stay loose and feeling good. Another thing you can do to stay in golf shape is to get in some cardio. Sure, playing golf doesn’t require that you need to be in marathon running shape, yet, it is still important that you can handle the walking involved for nine, 18, or 27 holes. Therefore, when you get the chance, jump on a treadmill and go for a 30 to 60 minutes stroll. Or, hit an elliptical machine or stair stepper and go hard for 20 or 30 minutes to really get your heart pumping. Riding a stationary bike is also a good way to get in some good cardio. Basically, just get in some kind of cardio in the off-season at least a few times a week so your body can handle walking again when it is time to golf. A third thing to do to keep in golf shape in the off-season is to do golf specific weight lifting. What does this mean you ask? Well, it means that you need to life weights that target the same muscles you use when you’re golfing. Some good golf specific weight lifting exercises includes squats, shoulder presses, leg swings, sit ups and planking, lunges, and tricep curls. If you really want to take your golf training to the next level, the easiest way to do it is to hire a trainer to help you out. If you are worried about cost, don’t because there are actually a lot of free virtual trainers that you can work with online who won’t charge you anything. To find them, just do a quick online search. If you do these three things mentioned here this off-season, you should be pretty well set physically for next year’s golf season. However, don’t forget about the mental side of your game and to get yourself mentally prepared for the upcoming year, come back in a few days to read about what you can do to get your head completely in the game.
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CLTheGolfer
How To Stretch Out Your Golf Season
Oct 19, 2015 9:52 PM
Tags: Golf   Travel   Dubai   golf season   golf destinations  
 
In some parts of the country, the time to play golf is starting to come to a close because days are getting shorter and the weather is turning cold. The thing is, you can stretch out your golf season if you try really, really hard. That’s right, there are ways to play golf longer if you want to and to learn about what those ways are, just keep on reading. One way to stretch out your golf season is to avoid being picky about the time that you golf. For example, instead of always having a specific set time that you like to go out, be flexible and golf at odd times like mid-morning or early afternoon on a weekday. At the end of the season, you have to be open to golfing whenever you can since it might be the last chance that you get. Another way to make your golf season longer is to layer up. What does this mean, well it means that when the weather turns cold, you need to be prepared for it so you can actually continue to golf. So, dress for the cold. Wear thermal underwear and an extra sweatshirt, or two, and don’t forget about putting on some warm wool socks along with investing in headgear that keeps your noggin warm and gloves that are easy to take on and off. You can even get gloves that are specifically designed for cold weather golfing. To find them, just do some shopping online. A third way to keep your golf season going is to travel where you can golf all year round. Sure, this might seem like a no brainer, but really it’s something that people tend to overlook because they think that once the weather is impossible to golf where they are, that means it’s over for everyone else too. Well, that’s simply just not the case. In some parts on the United States, and the world, people can golf all year round. So, when the weather turns cold and completely unplayable where you might live, book a trip and head somewhere where you can actually golf. Some amazing warm weather golf destinations include Florida, the Bahamas, Dubai, Mexico, Arizona, and Australia. In the end, if you want to stretch out your golf season, just take advantage of the ways to do it mentioned here. One of my favorites is to take a trip to some place warm. I’ve seen some awesome courses in other parts of the country and I highly advise that you check them out if you get the opportunity to do so. And, if you think it’s expensive to take a golf trip, think again due to the fact that there are travel plans out there at affordable prices that include airfare, lodging, and the best part, rounds of golf. I know it’s something that I’m going to look into again this year and I suggest that you do it too.
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Sean Donnelly
Keith Pelley can modernise the European Tour
Oct 8, 2015 12:49 PM
 
The European Tour is a sporting institution in need of a makeover. Where in America even the most mundane Tour events are scheduled so as to maximize media exposure and marketed in a manner which suggests that they are second only to The Masters in terms of competitive import, the PGA’s counterparts across the Atlantic have consistently shown themselves incapable of cultivating anywhere close to the same level of media attention around their flagship events. Much of the reasoning for this, one feels, is cultural and has to do with the manner in which professional golf developed in America compared to Europe. In continental Europe, for example, professional golf has only in the last two decades really begun to gain any kind of a foothold as a spectator pursuit in an already crowded sporting landscape. It arguably remains the case, therefore, that it is simply not possible for the French or Italian Opens – let alone those taking places in new growth areas for the sport such as Poland – to generate the kind of media attention that events of an equivalent profile do in America. Britain, meantime, is historic birthplace of the sport dating back to the later fifteenth-century. As a consequence the R&A (as anyone who takes the time to Google what those initials stand for will not be surprised to discover) prefer to administer events taking place in their jurisdiction in a more modest, understated (some might suggest antiquated) fashion that they feel befits the body’s exalted positon in golf’s institutional hierarchy. In the US, though, golf really ‘arrived’ as a popular recreational activity at the end of the nineteenth-century. This birthdate at once afforded the game the time required to meaningfully embed itself in the country’s sporting culture while also remaining free of the staid traditionalism which has stymied the professional sport’s development in Britain. After all, golf grew popular in the States just as a wave of professionalization was preparing to sweep across the country’s sporting landscape. The Professional Golfers Association (PGA) of America, for instance, was established in 1916, within three decades of the foundation of the country’s first golf clubs in 1880s. To put the speed of this development into some kind of context, the European Professional Golfers' Association (now the European Tour) was only founded in 1901, four decades after the inaugural Open Championship. Almost from the point of its arrival in America, therefore, golf was a professional sport and its elite practitioners organized and promoted themselves in the interests of generating profit. The early onset of professionalism in America’s golfing history, then, might go some way towards explaining why the PGA Tour has been so much more successful than their European counterparts at marketing the sport in the twentieth-century. In this respect it can be seen as heartening that the European Tour took the decision to replace its outgoing chief executive George O’Grady with a man steeped in North American marketing experience, Keith Pelley. Pelley has been recruited from Rogers Media in Canada, of which he was president from 2010, with previous experience across a range of Canadian sports and media outlets. The hope is that Pelley’s appointment will herald the dawning of a new era for the European Tour, one characterized by a greater emphasis on marketing events in fresh commercial territory while revamping the structure of underperforming tournaments. The early signs are certainly positive. Pelley’s standing his ground under pressure from the WGC to reschedule the French Open so as to avoid a clash with the Bridgestone Invitational, for instance, spoke to an impressive confidence in his ability to promote the European Tour event in such a way so that it may still prove a commercial success. His decision to allow Rory McIlroy partake in the season-ending Race to Dubai despite the Irishman’s lengthy injury lay-off, meantime, indicates his awareness of the Tour’s need to position its star names at the front-and-centre of its promotion strategy. History weighs heavy on the governance of the European Tour, but if the body’s storied past can be harnessed in such a way so that it invests its flagship events with a prestige frequently absent on the other side of the Atlantic, it can be transformed into the Tour’s greatest asset. This is a development strategy that Pelley has shown himself to impressively sensitive to early in his tenure and it may spell the way forward for European golf. [Image Source: Flickr under CC]
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CLTheGolfer
What Not To Do On The Golf Course
Sep 21, 2015 7:01 PM
Tags: Golf   golfing    golf course   Tiger Woods   Manners   Golf Etiquitte  
 
The other day, I was out on the golf course with my husband. We were enjoying the weather and the relaxed state that comes with playing a round of golf with the person you love. However, after four holes, that pretty much changed when we caught up with the group ahead of us. Reason being, they had no concept of golf etiquette. Like none, zero, zip, nadda, none. So, it made the rest of our outing that day one that we’d rather forget and it got me to thinking about what people shouldn’t do when they’re golfing. Here is the list I came up with in no particular order. - Don’t Be Loud – Sure, this might sound like a no brainer, but some golfers don’t realize that this is an iron clad rule when it comes to what not to do on the golf course. Golf is a sport that requires a lot of concentration and loud noises tend to throw a golfer off, especially in high pressure situations. Take Tiger Woods as an example, he really needs to concentrate when he’s golfing and even the tiniest of noises bother him. So, if he’s bothered that much by small noises, just think how loud noises bother the rest of us. - Don’t Be Rude – Being loud is annoying in itself to golfing, yet being rude is almost worse. An example of being rude, hitting your ball while another playing group is still on the tee. Or, taking your good sweet time playing and not letting the group behind you play through. Also, having bad manners is a no-no along with talking on your cell phone and swearing. Swearing is never good. Simply put, be nice to others and follow the golden rule. - Don’t Drink Too Much – Drinking a beer and maybe having a shot while you’re playing is indeed a great way to relax and enjoy your round. However, if you continue to drink over and over again, you’re going to not only ruin your golfing experience, but those that are around you as well. Therefore, you need to set a drinking limit for yourself and not go nuts. Keep it under control to have a good time. - Don’t Offer Unsolicited Advice – People don’t enjoy getting advice on how to play when it’s not asked for. Giving unsolicited advice can lead to harsh words and hurt feelings. For that reason, keep your “coaching” to yourself unless someone actually asks you for advice on how to hit the ball or how to approach a shot. You can lose friends on the golf course if you offer advice that’s not asked for, so, keep your mouth shut at all costs even if the person you’re playing with really, really needs it. Now, I’m sure there are other things that you should refrain from doing when you’re golfing that aren’t on this list, but in my mind, I think I pretty much have covered everything. For me, when it comes down golfers just need to be courteous of others and respect the game. If they’re not able to do that, they then shouldn’t be golfing.
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CLTheGolfer
How To Enjoy Golfing With A Little One
Sep 5, 2015 7:41 PM
Tags: Golf   golfing    children   child   toddler    driving range  
 
As a parent, sometimes it can be hard to enjoy playing golf with your children, especially if they’re under five with a short attention span. The thing is, you can actually enjoy golfing with your son or daughter that’s a toddler. How is this possible you ask? Well, you just have to be smart about how you approach taking him or her along for an outing at the golf course. And, to find out what being smart is in this instance, well, just keep on reading. One way to be smart when golfing with your toddler is to start small at first. For example, instead of lugging your little one out on an 18 hole adventure the first time you head to the links with your child in tow, head to the driving range the first time around. This way, you’re not committed to a super long day of golf, which would surely test you and your child’s resolve. The driving range will provide your child with a nice introduction to the sport and what’s going to happen when you’re playing. Show him or her that you’ll be hitting the golf ball a certain direction, talk about how it’s important that he or she stays quiet, and get him or her involved by allowing them to hit a few balls to. After you’ve hit the driving range a few times, then you can slowly build up the time your child is with you playing golf by graduating to an executive course, followed by nine holes at a regular course, and then when your little one has shown he or she can handle being around the sport for a long time without tantrums, then play 18 holes. Another way to be smart about golfing with your child is to have a plan in place. For instance, just don’t head to the course on a whim, hoping everything will work out. In place of that, decide what day you’re going to go and plan everything that day around it. Tell your son or daughter in advance, getting them excited. Then, the day off, get all the supplies that you’ll need on the course from sunscreen to snacks, a change of clothes, water, and anything else you might need to make things run smoothly. Finally, have a quick exit strategy in place. Like, if your child just simply melts down and there is absolutely nothing you can do about it, let someone outside of your golf party know ahead of time and have them on call to fly over to pick your kid up at the drop of a hat. And, a third way to be smart about golfing with your little son or daughter is to just be patient. Just like with golf itself, patience is key to having a good time. So for that reason, don’t get flustered with your little one and just take it easy, making sure to respond to them in a calm, cool, and collected way so no one get flustered and unhappy. In the end, if you follow what was mentioned above about golfing with your child, then you should be able to have a fun time with him or her when you’re all golfing. Just remember, Rome wasn’t built in a day and he or she will need some time to get used to the sport. In short, don’t push it when bringing him or her along, particularly if they’re playing with you. Simply relax and enjoy your time together because there’s always another time to be competitive, like when they’re all grown up and looking to beat you.
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CLTheGolfer
Golf, it’s a sport anyone can play
Aug 27, 2015 7:24 PM
Tags: Equipment   Golf Balls   Golf   golfers   golf clubs   golf course   golf players  
 
People often think that golf is a sport that’s reserved only for old retired men to play. The thing is, quite the opposite is true. Golf is actually a sport that the entire family can enjoy. Don’t believe it, well then read on to find out why. One reason golf is a sport that everyone can play is due to the fact it’s a pretty slow paced game. So, it doesn’t require a lot of top level physical endurance to do it unlike other sports like basketball or soccer. Basically, you can go at your own pace, and even use a ride along golf cart if you want, and don’t have to really push yourself physically to do it, making it a great low impact activity. Another reason why anyone can play golf is because anyone of any age can do it. Like, if you want to bring your younger son or daughter who is around 5 or 6 years old, you can all have fun. Or, if you’re older and are just looking for something fun to do with your spouse on a warm spring, summer, or fall day, then you can all go out and hit the links as well. A third reason why golf is a sport that anyone to take part in is how there are courses available to play on for a player at any experience level. For example, if you’re completely new to the sport, you can get some practice in at driving ranges to work on your long game. Some even have chipping areas and putting greens that allow you to practice your short game as well. Or, if you have a little bit of experience, then you can try out shorter executive level or par three courses. Regular golf courses are even designed for players of all experience levels given that they feature different level tees from men’s to women’s tees, seniors, and professional tees. In short, the game caters to the masses to ensure that every level player feels included. And, a fourth reason golf is something that anyone can do is due to the fact that it really doesn’t require all sorts of super specialized equipment to play. You simply need a few clubs, yes a few not a whole set, and a few golf balls, that's it. Now, the basic clubs you need to play are a driver, five-iron, seven-iron, a nine-iron, and a putter. That's it. Sure, you can get a lot more specialized clubs, yet they're really not necessary just like golf shoes, gloves, and all those other crazy gadgets that are on the market. So as you can see from all the above reasons, golf is a sport that doesn’t discriminate and it can be played by anyone who is looking for something fun to do. And, to find some great courses to play on in your area, simply hit the web. Now, what are you waiting for, get out there and start golfing. You can search all sorts of spots to hit a few balls in a matter of minutes. You’ll be glad that you did when you end up having an awesome time.
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CLTheGolfer
Ways To Golf On The Cheap
Aug 21, 2015 8:58 PM
Tags: Equipment   Golf   golfing    Wisconsin   coupons   golf coupons  
 
Golf, it can be a pretty costly sport to play, especially if you want to play a lot. There’s equipment to buy, greens fees to pay for, and really, this list of expenses can go on and on. The thing is, even though golf is pricey to play, you can still take part as much and as often as you want. Basically, all you have to do is be thrifty about it and take advantage of the following ways to golf on the cheap. The first way to golf on the cheap is to use coupons for the golf courses that you play at. Okay, okay, you might be thinking, coupons, aren’t those just for little old ladies who want to get a good deal on toilet paper? Or moms who want to save on cleaning products to keep their homes clean? Well, yes, coupons are great for saving money on those household items, yet they’re also a really good option for saving money when you’re golfing too. Believe it or not, there are quite a few golf courses around, especially in Wisconsin, that hand out coupons so people will come to their course and golf. One way to find them is to browse the Internet and type something like, “local golf coupons,” in your web search browser. In seconds, all sorts of deals will pop up and you’ll be able to save money big time. Another way to save money when you’re golfing to be one of the last golfers out on the course late in the day. You see, some golf courses offer twilight rates, giving discounts to players who don’t mind golfing when the sun is on its way down. To find these golf courses, again, hit the Internet to see what golf courses near you offer twilight rates. You could also call around using the Yellow Pages as your guide as well if you don’t have access to the World Wide Web. A third way of saving money when you’re playing golf is to be smart about the equipment you purchase. For example, instead of buying completely brand new clubs, be thrifty and purchase a set that is slightly used. Or, in place of purchasing a full set, just get replacement clubs for those that you use the most. Like, if you hit with your driver, five iron, pitching wedge, and putter the most, then simply get new clubs for those and keep the other ones that you have since you don’t use them as much. You can also save money on the equipment you use by getting it when it goes on clearance at the stores or by purchasing what you need at different auction sites, like EBay, at almost a fraction of the cost. Yes, it does take a little bit of work to find the best deals, but it’s really worth doing to keep your equipment expenses down. When it comes down to it, you can actually get in a lot of golfing without having to spend a lot of money to do it. All you have to do is follow the tips here and you’ll be able to enjoy the sport that you love over and over again.
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CLTheGolfer
The Fuel to Keep You Going on the Golf Course
Aug 5, 2015 8:37 PM
Tags: Golf   food   protein   Gatorade   Powerbars   calories   energy  
 
Playing a round of golf, whether it’s nine or 18 holes, requires a lot of energy. For example, during a nine hole round, a male player weighing 190 lbs can burn up to 130 calories per hour lwalking. If he golfs 18 holes, he can double, even triple that number depending upon how long the course is. Now, because golfing requires so much energy, you need to keep your body fueled and hydrated. And to help you do that, here’s a quick rundown on some of the better fueling options. First, let’s focus on the better food options to keep your body fueled and ready to go.One of those better food options is to keep you in high gear are hard boiled eggs. Yes, that’s right. You see, hard boiled eggs are filled with protein, which will provide you with the necessary amount energy to get through your round. Along with hard boiled eggs, there are a lot of other foods filled with a lot of protein that you can eat to keep you energized as well including nuts, Powerbars, and peanut butter. If you don't need protein and are feeling like your low on sugar and can't focus, then grab a few oranges or some Gu Energy Gel. Both will get you thinking straight again in no time. On top of these food options, a few other good snacking choices for when you're on the golf course consist of granola bars, candy bars like Snickers or Pay Day, and trail mix. Okay, since we covered what foods to eat, let’s now turn to the types of drinks to guzzle down when you’re golfing. Obviously, one of the main beverages that comes to mind is water and yes, it’s very important to drink a fair amount of water even when you’re not taking part in a sport. However, the big downfall about water is that it doesn’t necessarily give you all the nutrients that you need to truly stay hydrated. That’s why, you need to drink other liquids in addition to water to get those necessary nutrients. One good option is Gatorade. It’s basically one of the most tried and true ways to stay hydrated because of how long it’s been around. Invented in the mid 196o's, it’s filled with vitamins, nutrients, and electrolytes that are essential in keeping your body functioning at a high level. What’s nice is that Gatorade now comes in all sorts of varieties including different flavors, calorie levels, and nutrient levels. Along with Gatorade some other great beverage options to drink to stay hydrated include Poweraide, Vitamin Water, All Sport, Revive, Aquaris, and many, many others. By eating and drinking the fuel and hydration options mentioned here, you should be able to maintain high energy levels when you’re playing golf. So, get shopping to get prepared for your next round, you’ll be glad when you’re feeling strong and playing well.
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CLTheGolfer
Simple Tips To Improve Your Golf Game
Jul 28, 2015 9:35 AM
 
Are you unhappy with how you're playing golf lately? However, don't quite know what to do to improve? If you nodded your head yes to those two questions, then keep reading? Why? Because there are actually quite a few simple tips that you can take advantage of to get your golf game going in the right direction and they're going to be focused on right now. Tip # 1: Slow Down Too often, golfers don't take their time when they're playing. You'll see some people rushing their shots on occasion while others will hurry through their practice swings or lining up their puts. This is a big, big mistake since if you rush what you're doing when you're golfing, you're definitely not going to end up with the score that you want. Thus, it's important to slow down and take your time lining up that next shot or figuring out the approach that you want to take to the next hole. Remember, it's golf not track and field, thus, taking your time is okay. Tip #2: Hit the Putting and Chipping Green One of the places where golfers seem to give up the most strokes is around and on the green. That's right, the short game is typically a golfer's worst enemy. For that reason, before you start your round, head to the putting and chipping green for a little practice time. This will allow you to get into a short game rhythm to build confidence for your round. Tip #3: Concentrate You'd be surprised by how many people are distracted when they're playing. For example, sometimes if you're about to swing, you might find that your mind wanders to a conversation earlier in the day or that you hear the noises around you. All of these things can distract your golfing efforts. So, what you need to do is block them all out to completely focus on what you're doing. Tip #4: Track Your Game What does this mean? Well, it means that you need to understand the strengths and weaknesses of your game. To understand both, you need to either make mental notes, or write notes down, of what you do on the golf course. Like, how you shoot certain clubs and what you do in different yardage situations, that sort of thing. By understanding your strengths and weaknesses, you can play to them instead of against them. Tip #5: Have Fun Remember, golf is a sport that's supposed to be enjoyable and relaxing. Let's face it, not all of us have the skills of a Jordan Spieth or Phil Mickelson. We play for recreation. So, if you overlook that fact, you're going to get to worked up and overly competitive about what you're doing, which will lead to a lousy score. Simply put, just try to have fun. By using the simple tips mentioned here, you should be well on your way to improving your golf game. One thing to keep in mind though, golf is a game that requires both patience and time. So, if you really, really want to improve, then it's essential that you commit to improving by practicing and getting out on the links as often as you possibly can.
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