Let us know what you think about the site, we would love to hear from you:

Login Here

   Sign Up Now »
Email Address
Password
Keep Me Logged In
Forgot Password?
You are currently logged into Facebook. You can use your facebook account to login or signup
Login/Sign Up

Sign Up Now

   Login Here »
Email Address
Password
Confirm Password
Username
Phone Number
Captcha Image
By signing up you agree to our Terms Of Use
You are currently logged into Facebook. You can use your facebook account to login or signup
Login/Sign Up

Forgot Password

Email Address

19th Hole
News and Opinion

Golf Blogs: US Open

 [clear]
Date CreatedMost Popular

Sean Donnelly
Johnson aiming to exorcize major ghosts at Pebble Beach
Jun 12, 2019 8:43 AM
 
As final-round capitulations in major championship golf tournaments go, one would struggled to identify a more traumatic experience than that endured by Dustin Johnson when the US Open was last held at Pebble Beach Golf Linksin California in 2010. The then 24-year-old began the tournament among the favourites for the title; he had just claimed his second consecutive Pebble Beach Pro-Am victorythree months previously and had already broken into the top-20 of the Official World Golf Rankings. Johnson started solidly, following up a level-par opening-round 71 with a 70 on the Friday to stay within two-shots of Graeme McDowell’s 36-hole lead. When he signed for a 5-under third-round of 66 to move three-strokes clear of McDowell going into Sunday, his major championship breakthrough appeared a formality. What followed was difficult to watch. Dustin Johnson will continue working with his coach from Coastal Carolina following his split from Claude Harmon.https://t.co/vJ5hlUMxHW— Golf Digest (@GolfDigest) 5 June 2019 After opening with a shaky par, Johnson played himself out of contention within three-holes of the final-round. He tripple bogeyed the par-4 second, to allow McDowell draw back level at the summit of the leaderboard, and double-bogeyed the third to slip two-strokes further back. Unsurprisingly, perhaps, Johnson never recovered his composure and signed, ultimately, for an 11-over final-round 82and an eighth-place finish, eight strokes shy of winner, McDowell. When Johnson went on to squander a single-stroke lead with a hole to playin bizarre circumstances at the US PGA Championship at Whistling Straits two-months later, commentators inevitably began to question his mentality. Subsequent high-profile, final-round capitulations at the 2011 Open Championship at Royal St. George's, where he threw away another 54-hole lead, and at the 2015 U.S. Open, where he had opportunities to win from 12 feet and tie from 4 feet on the final green only to settle for a bogey and second-place finish to Jordan Spieth, did little to alleviate such perceptions. Of course, Johnson eventually succeeded in purging the major championship-shaped monkey from his shoulder at the 2016 US Open at Oakmont; however, he never managed to build on that success at major level, and his runner-up finishes at The Masters and US PGA Championship this season means that he has now completed a Grand Slam of second-place major finishes. Question marks remain still regarding Johnson’s mentality when it comes to performing at the highest level of the sport, and while he has repeatedly avowedthat his 2010 experience at Pebble Beach did not leave psychological scar tissue, it is conspicuous that he has never since managed to win on the California track. This weekend would be an ideal time to exercise such daemons. [Image Source: Flickr under CC]
0 Comments

crudbay
What is a Craig Wood?
Jun 23, 2015 7:45 AM
 
When Jordan Spieth wound up the winner of the U.S. Open to go along with his Masters green jacket earned earlier this year he joined the short list of golfers who have won the first two majors of a season. And it is one of the oddest lists in golf: Tiger Woods, Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer, Ben Hogan and Craig Wood. The list looks like you were taking a roll call of golf immortals from the past 75 years and some guy named Craig Wood snuck into to the photo. Who is this Craig Wood? Wood was born in the heart of the Adirondack Mountains in Lake Placid, New York in 1901 where his father was a foreman for a timber company. He turned professional at the age of 19, just like Jordan Spieth. Things were a tad different for Wood, however. There was no pro tour to play on in 1920. His professional duties mostly meant mowing the grass and working the counter in the pro shop. He played tournaments when he could and in 1928 won the New Jersey PGA Championship. After that the nascent professional tour began to come together and Wood was a staple on the circuit in the 1930s. He won a dozen tournaments that decade but no majors. He came awfully close, however. Wood lost all four major championships in extra holes. Until Greg Norman suffered a similar run of bad luck in playoffs a half-century later, Wood was the only golfer to suffer that fate. His most famous loss was at the 1935 Masters when Gene Sarazen knocked in his famous double eagle from the 15th fairway to catch Wood and then whip him in the playoff. In 1941, Wood finally broke through. He drubbed the Masters field by three strokes at Augusta and then won the U.S. Open by three shots again at Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth - the backyard of Hogan and fellow golfing great Byron Nelson. Wood was 39 years old at this time and golf would soon shut down as the world became engulfed in war. He never got a chance to add to his hot streak. Wood wound up with 21 wins and was eventually enshrined in the World Golf Hall of Fame. Maybe not the glory that drapes the other members of the "first two majors" club, but the "Blond Bomber" could certainly run with those guys.
0 Comments

GolfSmash Bloggers

Sean Donnelly
Blog Posts: 1347
crudbay
Blog Posts: 90
OfficialGolfSmash
Blog Posts: 38
CLTheGolfer
Blog Posts: 33
Matt Martin
Blog Posts: 10
MattRistine
Blog Posts: 6
Darren DeYoung
Blog Posts: 6
Anyagolf
Blog Posts: 4